jump to navigation

Australian Veterinary Association – Darwin – Holistic / Acupuncture May 23, 2009

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
1 comment so far

Wednesday 20 May 2009

8:00am – Use of acupuncture for a variety of equine conditions. Kevin May

This lecture discusses the use of acupuncture for the conditions such as inappetance, apnoea, shock,  post-operative ileus  and acute laminitis which respond to acupuncture.
9:00am – Use of acupuncture in the treatment of equine reproductive problems. Kevin May

Acupuncture has many applications in equine reproduction.   It can be used alone, but an integrated approach with western medicine can give better results.  This lecture discusses the theory and applications of acupuncture in some common equine reproductive problems.

Thursday 21 May 2009

9:00am – Review of acupuncture and applications in clinical practice 1. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture reviews the numerous published experimental studies that describe the scientific basis of acupuncture for pain control and also how it affects the body’s physiological functions. It will also look at how the results of these studies can be applied in the treatment of clinical cases in veterinary practice.

10:30am – Review of acupuncture and applications in clinical practice 2. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture reviews the numerous published experimental studies that describe the scientific basis of acupuncture for pain control and also how it affects the body’s physiological functions. It will also look at how the results of these studies can be applied in the treatment of clinical cases in veterinary practice.

11:30am – Acupuncture for gastrointestinal disease. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture will review the diagnostic signs that are important in making an accurate diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease and choosing points and formulas that will treat acute and chronic disease such as gastroenteritis, motility disorders and inflammatory bowel disease

2:00pm – Use of acupuncture for diagnosis and treatment  of sore backs in equine. Kevin May

Diagnosing the origin of equine back pain, as well as treating it, can be a challenge to any veterinarian.   This lecture discusses techniques of evaluating and treating sore backs using acupuncture principles and relevant acupuncture points.  This discussion primarily concentrates on conditions affecting the  lumbosacral area, but does include some thoracic spinal conditions.  The advantage of these points and techniques are that they can be used even in the most difficult cases, where the horses are very sore and reluctant to be examined or treated.

3:00pm – Acupuncture for neoplasia 1. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture will review the diagnostic signs of neoplasia and how acupuncture can be used as an adjunct to standard treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy or an aid in treating paraneoplastic syndrome.   Studies have shown that acupuncture is effective in treating post chemotherapy nausea, reducing the pain of the tumour or radiation, preventing the severe reduction in white cells post chemotherapy and much more.

4:30pm – Acupuncture for neoplasia 2. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture will review the diagnostic signs of neoplasia and how acupuncture can be used as an adjunct to standard treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy or an aid in treating paraneoplastic syndrome.   Studies have shown that acupuncture is effective in treating post chemotherapy nausea, reducing the pain of the tumour or radiation, preventing the severe reduction in white cells post chemotherapy and much more.

Advertisements

Acupuncture for pets ‘on the rise’ May 23, 2009

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
add a comment

A conference of veterinarians in Darwin has discussed alternative therapies in response to reports of growing demand for acupuncture and herbal treatments for pets. Several vets attending the Australian Veterinary Association conference in Darwin say demand is growing, with many vets now offering acupuncture, massage and natural plant based treatments instead of antibiotics. Twenty-five vets from the conference visited a naturopath to learn more about the therapies. The Australian Veterinary Association says they should be rigorously tested and registered to ensure they are safe for animals. The president of the Australian Veterinary Association Dr Mark Lawrie says conventional antibiotics are no longer effective on many animals. “It’s an adaptation, really, of bacteria over time, that [resistance] will occur,” he said. “We know there’s been a lot of good work done to see that there is rising levels of resistance in humans to multi-resistant strains of bacteria and we are seeing some evidence of that in animals.” But he says alternative therapies are not necessarily the answer to this problem. “I don’t think that’s a valid argument with that particular issue, in that it’s more the appropriate use of whatever drug that you use that’s the critical thing,” he said. “Any treatment of animals should be done by a veterinarian and any product that is used should be appropriately tested and registered.” He has urged pet owners to follow vets’ instructions to prevent the risk of antibiotic resistance.