jump to navigation

International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS) December 18, 2010

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
2 comments

About Us

SEARCH FOR A VET

The International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting excellence in the practice of veterinary acupuncture, as an integral part of the total veterinary health care delivery system. The Society endeavors to establish uniformly high standards of veterinary acupuncture through its educational programs and accreditation examination. IVAS seeks to integrate veterinary acupuncture and the practice of western veterinary science.

IVAS was formed and chartered in 1974. It is the only international veterinary acupuncture organization and has members from many countries. Consequently, it serves a networking and communication function. IVAS coordinates veterinary acupuncture activity on this international basis. However, it is expected that each country, state, province or principality eventually will develop local veterinary acupuncture societies to respond to local issues, as has already happened in several countries. IVAS also encourages the formation of student chapters at veterinary colleges.

The International Veterinary Acupuncture Society has been incorporated and chartered as a non-profit perpetual educational organization

Síndrome de Wobbler‏ October 3, 2008

Posted by MSW in Wobbler Syndrome.
5 comments

GRANADA, España 2008

A mediados de mayo, Maria Lombide se despertó, encontrándose con que su hembra Dobermann “Titi” de 7 años estaba parapléjica de los cuatro miembros y con obvios signos de dolor. Tres veterinarios locales le diagnosticaron Síndrome de Wobbler. Tenian muy poca (es decir; ninguna) esperanza de que se recuperase Titi´.

Pero Maria no estaba dispuesta a aceptarlo y buscó alternativas.

Encontró un Medico y Cirujano que también practica Acupuntura y Naturismo – Homeopatía

Dr Acuña ha tratado a Titi desde 22 de mayo 2008 cuando fue llevada en camilla a su despacho, hasta (por ahora) 18 de Julio 2008 cuando salió del coche con un salto y corrió – un poco torpe – las 18 escaleras arriba hasta la casa

Esta página es tanto una celebración del proceso de curación como una guia para los que buscan ayuda cuando sus perros estén afectados del Síndrome de Wobbler

Mitch Williamson

Maria Lombide Ezpeleta

Wobbler Syndrome Treated Successfully by Acupuncture! July 20, 2008

Posted by MSW in Wobbler Syndrome.
add a comment

GRANADA, Spain 2008

In mid-May 2008 Maria Lombide awoke to find her Doberman female ‘Titi’, 7 years old, could not walk and showed obvious signs of distress and illness. To her dismay Titi was diagnosed by three local Veterinary Surgeons with “Wobbler Syndrome”. The vets had no hope of any recovery for Titi.

However Maria was NOT going to accept this and looked for alternatives.

She found a Medical Doctor and Surgeon who also practiced Acupuncture and Natural Healing.

Dr Acuña has treated Titi since 22nd May, 2008 when she had to be carried to his surgery, till last treatment as of Friday 18th July 2008, where she leap out of the car at home, and ran – somewhat clumsily – up the 18 steps of the outside stairs!

This website is both a celebration of a healing process and a guide for those seeking assistance when their dogs are affected by Wobbler Syndrome.

Mitch Williamson

Maria Lombide Ezpeleta

Wobblers……is there an alternative to surgery? July 20, 2008

Posted by MSW in Wobbler Syndrome.
1 comment so far

PLEASE NOTE THIS WEBSITE is now at http://www.syllysylvia.com/

This site was created to tell the story of Sylvia and the alternative treatment used in the healing of Wobblers, (as prescribed by several veterinarians, both conventional and holistic). It is meant to provide information for those who prefer to avoid invasive treatment (spinal surgery), and I have included the names of Sylvia’s veterinarians for those who wish to pursue the information further. Along with this, is information on Sylvia’s diet, supplements,and vaccination protocol that I have followed. A more detailed story appears in the Summer and Fall ’99 issues of Doberman Quarterly. A further update can be found in the Fall 2001 issue.

 

SYLVIA is a rescue we adopted in March 1995 when she was 14 months old. She’s a wild clown whose antics have provided fodder for the “Sylly Syl” stories in the Doberman Quarterly and The Doberman Annual. She participates in obedience and agility and her story can be enjoyed at: Sylvia and Mo……on the web.

In late December 1998, I noticed that she was slipping on our hardwood floors, but other than that, she was as active as ever. Having had one bitch with wobblers, Syl’s symptoms were so different that I assumed she just needed an adjustment. So off we went to Dr. Bill Connolly who practices sports medicine.

 

In watching her move, he saw something far more serious. An x-ray sent to the University of Georgia resulted in his recommendation for a myleogram and surgery at the University. I explained that while he knew medicine, I knew my dog and her personality would not handle the required months of inactivity following surgery, nor did I want to proceed with such invasive treatment. I told him that I wanted to treat her with acupuncture and any other holistic means he could come up with. He agreed.

 

After the first set of 3 treatments we began a weekly routine. On the first of these visits, Dr Connolly mentioned an upcoming seminar for holistic vets on gold bead implants. Dr. Terry Durkes of Marion, Indiana was coming to Atlanta in eight weeks to teach the seminar. The implants would produce a constant stimulation of the acupuncture points, eliminating the need for weekly treatments. He asked if I might be interested in implants for Sylvia, to be done by Dr Durkes at the seminar. Of course I was. READ MORE

 

 

Team Sylvia

 

Dr. Bill Connolly of Gwinnett Animal Hospital, Snellville, GA, who recommended surgery, but when I refused, picked up the ball and found someone who could address wobblers with an alternative solution. 770-972-0447

 

Dr Terry Durkes, Western Avenue Animal Hospital, Marion, IN who paved the way with his treatment of wobblers–implanted acupuncture beads and a neck wrap. His gentle hands and intuitive ways provided the final step in her healing process. 765-664-0734 Email: durkes1@mcleodusa.net Website: http://www.durkesanimalhospital.com/

 

Dr. Sandy Hedge of Briarcliff Animal Hospital, Atlanta, GA, Syl’s conventional vet, who trains with us and knew that Sylvia’s personality was not suited for conventional methods. 404-874-6393

Dr. Susan Wynn of Wynn Clinic for Theraputic Alternatives, Marietta, Ga, whose interest and support was greatly valued, along with her wonderful website. http://www.altvetmed.com/ 770-424-0303

A most heartfelt thank-you to Syl’s team.

love,

Christy Waehner

Atlanta, GA

 

Janine Adams wrote a wonderful article on Syl’s treatment and recovery in the August 2001 issue of The Whole Dog Journal. She did a superb job interviewing me and has some wonderful quotes form her interview with Dr Durkes as well.

Questions? Please email Christy at Syllly Syl@aol.com

2011 in review December 31, 2011

Posted by MSW in Uncategorized.
add a comment

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,100 times in 2011. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

HORSE ACUPUNCTURE COURSES November 23, 2011

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
3 comments

WELCOME TO MY WEB PAGE

ALLAN MOFFATT B.SC., B.ACUP. (AUSTRALIA)

Equine Therapeutic Acupuncture course

(1 year Diploma)

Equine therapeutic acupuncture arises out of equine body-work methods such as massage, manipulation and shiatsu (acupressure).

This is also suitable for veterinary acupuncture which arises out of veterinary medicine.

It is also suitable for small animal acupuncture as the basic principles and skills remain the same.

Farriers and shoesmiths will enjoy this.

includes Equine Cosmetic Acupuncture.

THE APPROACH OF THIS COURSE WILL BE:

• Learn the Energy flows within the horse body

• Learn how to maintain and balance them using:

• Energy massage

• Muscle release

• Electrical and magnetic acupuncture modes

• Laser and red-light laser

•Dry needling technique

• Traditional Chinese technique

• Learn the acupuncture points and learn the ‘touch ‘ to find them.

• Learn acupuncture treatments which work, for a very large range of horse ailments and conditions.

• Learn to recognize these conditions.

• There will a brief introduction to Homeopathy and Spirit-work touching on some aspects of herbal medicine.

• A beginning hands-on course in Equine Chiropractic is also avaliable as an additional unit.

• You will have the benefit of the practical knowledge and guidance of a teacher of 15 yrs experience working with horses after 5 years experience working full-time with people.

This will deepen your understanding and love of your horse.

It will be useful to improve horse performance such as in Eventing, Showjumping, Endurance, and improve the horses appearance as in Showing and Dressage.

This 42 lesson course is very suitable for horse lovers, and those already working in this field such as chiropractors, physio, veterinary, nurses, race-horse owners and laser owners.

Courses are by correspondence via DVD or online: 1 lesson fortnightly (one theory, one practical) with questions for reply.

Equine Therapeutic Acupuncture course is available to students from these countries; New Zealand , Australia, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, United States, Canada,Greece, Italy. Spain, UAR, Malaysia, India, and others.

LINK

Wobbler Syndrome – Mufasa – Acupuncture Physiotherapy – “Holistic Veterinary Service” Portugal November 14, 2010

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
add a comment

 

Rehabilitation of a cat with hindlimb paralysis through acupuncture, homeopathy and physiotherapy. Home Care service of “Holistic Veterinary Medicine” in Portugal. More info in: http://www.veterinariaholistica.net Recuperação de um gato com paralisia dos membros posteriores com recurso à acupunctura, homeopatia e fisioterapia. Serviço Home Care de “Veterinária Holística” em Portugal. Para mais informações ver http://www.veterinariaholistica.net

Australian Veterinary Association – Darwin – Holistic / Acupuncture May 23, 2009

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
1 comment so far

Wednesday 20 May 2009

8:00am – Use of acupuncture for a variety of equine conditions. Kevin May

This lecture discusses the use of acupuncture for the conditions such as inappetance, apnoea, shock,  post-operative ileus  and acute laminitis which respond to acupuncture.
9:00am – Use of acupuncture in the treatment of equine reproductive problems. Kevin May

Acupuncture has many applications in equine reproduction.   It can be used alone, but an integrated approach with western medicine can give better results.  This lecture discusses the theory and applications of acupuncture in some common equine reproductive problems.

Thursday 21 May 2009

9:00am – Review of acupuncture and applications in clinical practice 1. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture reviews the numerous published experimental studies that describe the scientific basis of acupuncture for pain control and also how it affects the body’s physiological functions. It will also look at how the results of these studies can be applied in the treatment of clinical cases in veterinary practice.

10:30am – Review of acupuncture and applications in clinical practice 2. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture reviews the numerous published experimental studies that describe the scientific basis of acupuncture for pain control and also how it affects the body’s physiological functions. It will also look at how the results of these studies can be applied in the treatment of clinical cases in veterinary practice.

11:30am – Acupuncture for gastrointestinal disease. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture will review the diagnostic signs that are important in making an accurate diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease and choosing points and formulas that will treat acute and chronic disease such as gastroenteritis, motility disorders and inflammatory bowel disease

2:00pm – Use of acupuncture for diagnosis and treatment  of sore backs in equine. Kevin May

Diagnosing the origin of equine back pain, as well as treating it, can be a challenge to any veterinarian.   This lecture discusses techniques of evaluating and treating sore backs using acupuncture principles and relevant acupuncture points.  This discussion primarily concentrates on conditions affecting the  lumbosacral area, but does include some thoracic spinal conditions.  The advantage of these points and techniques are that they can be used even in the most difficult cases, where the horses are very sore and reluctant to be examined or treated.

3:00pm – Acupuncture for neoplasia 1. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture will review the diagnostic signs of neoplasia and how acupuncture can be used as an adjunct to standard treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy or an aid in treating paraneoplastic syndrome.   Studies have shown that acupuncture is effective in treating post chemotherapy nausea, reducing the pain of the tumour or radiation, preventing the severe reduction in white cells post chemotherapy and much more.

4:30pm – Acupuncture for neoplasia 2. Bruce Ferguson

This lecture will review the diagnostic signs of neoplasia and how acupuncture can be used as an adjunct to standard treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy or an aid in treating paraneoplastic syndrome.   Studies have shown that acupuncture is effective in treating post chemotherapy nausea, reducing the pain of the tumour or radiation, preventing the severe reduction in white cells post chemotherapy and much more.

Acupuncture for pets ‘on the rise’ May 23, 2009

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
add a comment

A conference of veterinarians in Darwin has discussed alternative therapies in response to reports of growing demand for acupuncture and herbal treatments for pets. Several vets attending the Australian Veterinary Association conference in Darwin say demand is growing, with many vets now offering acupuncture, massage and natural plant based treatments instead of antibiotics. Twenty-five vets from the conference visited a naturopath to learn more about the therapies. The Australian Veterinary Association says they should be rigorously tested and registered to ensure they are safe for animals. The president of the Australian Veterinary Association Dr Mark Lawrie says conventional antibiotics are no longer effective on many animals. “It’s an adaptation, really, of bacteria over time, that [resistance] will occur,” he said. “We know there’s been a lot of good work done to see that there is rising levels of resistance in humans to multi-resistant strains of bacteria and we are seeing some evidence of that in animals.” But he says alternative therapies are not necessarily the answer to this problem. “I don’t think that’s a valid argument with that particular issue, in that it’s more the appropriate use of whatever drug that you use that’s the critical thing,” he said. “Any treatment of animals should be done by a veterinarian and any product that is used should be appropriately tested and registered.” He has urged pet owners to follow vets’ instructions to prevent the risk of antibiotic resistance.

Introducing ‘Hendrix’ January 29, 2009

Posted by MSW in Wobbler Syndrome.
3 comments

hendrix

“Hendrix” was recently diagnosed with Wobbler Syndrome and given steroid, muscle relaxers, and pain medication. This treatment had a positive effect but it’s not really getting the job done. Surgery was suggested if the current treatment fails. He is big -105 lbs – red Doberman of 3 yrs, very strong and playful. I think recovery from an invasive procedure would be difficult for him. -Ted

Titi Movies – On the Terrace October 3, 2008

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
add a comment

Movie 1

Movie 2

Quicktime Player/Plugin Required

Titi  – Sadly Passed peacefully on May 25, 2011, born February 28, 2001

TITI’S RECOVERY JOURNAL Part I I October 3, 2008

Posted by MSW in Treatment.
add a comment

Day 10 – Titi commenced treatment with Dr Acuña

Day 11 – After second treatment with Dr Acuña Titi was able to stand with assistance.

Day 12 – Third treatment: Titi again seemed brighter and her body was at more ease.

Day 13 – Fourth treatment: Titi was almost able to stand by herself and tried to take a step.

Day 15 – Fifth treatment: Titi could now stand by herself and walk with assistance.

Day 21 – After two more treatments Titi could walk and jump up on her sofa by herself.

Day 23 – More treatment and now Titi could walk around the terrace by herself but not use steps.

Day 28 – Further treatment for Titi who could now get out of the car and walk into Dr Acuña’s surgery by herself. Previously she had to be carried in and out of the car. By now she knew where she was going and what benefit Dr Acuña’s treatment gave her—just look at her expression in the above pictures.

Day 32 – Coming back from treatment Titi gets out of the car and takes joyous pride in walking up the outside stairs.

Day 36 – After her treatment by Dr Acuña Titi leaps off the treatment table, to the delight of all.

Day 37 – Titi can walk around the house and garden, climb stairs with only a hint of ‘wobbles’.